eroakirkosta.fi

Tuesday, February 28, 2006

Irakilaiset & Husseinin alasajo

BBC:

In most countries, more people think removing Saddam Hussein was a mistake than think it was the right decision.

In 20 countries, there is overall support for US-led forces to withdraw from Iraq in the next few months.

Only in nine of the remaining 15 countries do more people believe US-led forces should remain until the situation is stabilised. Six countries are divided.

The removal of Saddam Hussein in 2003 is seen as a mistake in 21 countries, compared with 11 countries where more people view it as the right decision. Three countries are divided.

Iraqis are the most convinced that the removal of Saddam Hussein was right, with 74% agreeing with the move.

US President George W Bush has ruled out any hasty withdrawal from Iraq, saying the decision to will be made by military commanders, and not under political pressure
.


Pikkupojan mukaan irakilaisten mielipide jäi Helsingin Sanomissa sivumaininnaksi. Satakunnan Kansa, paikallinen vasurilehtemme, kyllä uutisoi tästä mielipidekyselystä, mutta päätti jättää irakilaisten mielipiteen kokonaan huomiotta. Fair & Balanced... Aivan kuin joidenkin eurooppalaisten tai argentiinalaisten mielipiteellä olisi tässä asiassa jotain merkitystä.

Ruotsin viisain mies, Johan Norberg, uutisoi keskustalaisen Brookings-tutkimuslaitoksen tutkimuksesta, joka viittaa samanlaisiin mielipiteisiin kuin BBC:n mielipidemittaus (lainaus Norbergin):


But did you know that despite everything, 77 percent of Iraqis (almost all Shias and Kurds, almost no Sunnis) think that the war was worth it, to get rid of the tyrant?

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5 Comments:

Blogger Jason Ward said...

Any luck with the Army?

March 01, 2006 7:07 AM  
Blogger Jason Ward said...

Thanks for the link... Keep up the good work!

March 01, 2006 7:08 AM  
Anonymous Petteri said...

Before we get too teary eyed about these new Shia leaders in Baghdad and compare them to the idealistic founding fathers, we should remember that they are basicly men with high ambitions and need for power. Nothing is wrong with that, but lets not wrap them in a respectability they probably don't deserve. It also might be in this case that they are bastards but at least they are our bastards. Actually this last point is not clear enough for it is not that long ago when we, the West in general and the US in particular, didn't want to touch the Shias even with the proverbial ten foot pole. The delightful gents of the Thaliban came to take a bite of our hindsights and it is not totally out of the realm of possibility that the Shias will do the same.

March 08, 2006 5:15 AM  
Anonymous Petteri said...

hindsights=hindsides

March 08, 2006 10:41 AM  
Blogger Mikko Sandt said...

Any luck with the Army?

Gonna wait until summer and if nothing happens by then (=no luck in the lottery) I'm gonna try through the route you suggested. If at any point you come up with something new, feel free to email me or something.

Before we get too teary eyed about these new Shia leaders in Baghdad and compare them to the idealistic founding fathers, we should remember that they are basicly men with high ambitions and need for power.

I've been scared shitless of a Shia uprising ever since the war began since it's mostly the Shia camp that has been a bit too eager in making politics out of Islam. However, if this is their democracy then so be it. I'd say the current Shia regime loses its legitimacy the moment it undermines democracy, for example, by removing women's right to vote or participate in elections & such.

March 13, 2006 2:49 AM  

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